Smile

by Sahand Nayebaziz

“She can’t stop smiling.” My dad used these words to describe Marisa to our longtime neighbor. My girlfriend and I have been lumped together as “a couple of smiles” by strangers many times, some who just met us a moment earlier as we walked into a room. Apparently, a smile can go a long way.

When you think about it, we all go a long way practically every day. How you feel in the morning isn’t always how you feel in bed at the end of the night. And I would never tell somebody they should be smiling all day because that’s just not how life works.

If smiles were classified in the dictionary, “fake smile” would be hundreds of pages away from the real thing. A fake smile can mean so many things, a perfect substitution for what you might want to say but can’t.

I’m seeing you smile now, and it’s making me smile, and it’s making me forget what I was worried about a minute ago.

Sahand Nayebaziz

But then, so can the real thing. Words often follow a smile. And if words often follow a smile, then in the historical record of that moment, you said something with a smile before you said anything else.

Seeing another smile has an effect on us that can not be explained without tapping into the humor, the root, the immediacy of life. I’m seeing you smile now, and it’s making me smile, and it’s making me forget what I was worried about a minute ago.

Maybe I can just watch Marisa’s smile and stop time, or at least slow it down a little bit.